Reading at Good Shepherd | Good Shepherd Catholic Primary School

Reading at Good Shepherd

Reading At School

At Good Shepherd, we encourage children to read as much as possible to help them build a love of reading. Reading is the key to a good education and future economic success. Being able to read well opens doors in life! 

We teach word reading through a phonics programme called Letters and Sounds. Mrs Carlin is our English subject leader and works hard to ensure high quality teaching across the school. We teach comprehension through English, Guided Reading and cross-curricular lessons. We hear children read one-to-one regularly, as it is an opportunity to assess progress and gives children a chance to practice their skills. For those children who need extra or specialised support, we provide very successful intervention programmes to ensure that every child can be a successful reader.

We want all our children to go on to Secondary school being able to read fluently with a high level of understanding. We want our children to love reading, to enjoy settling down with a book, to be able to talk about books and authors. We know that the more a child reads, the better he/she will get. And a child who reads out of school is thirteen times more likely to read above the expected level for their age. 

We can’t do this on our own. That is why we have clear expectations of how our parents can support. We need the children to read every night to an adult and use the Home Reading Diary to record this.

Home Reading

Home Reading – How you can help at home

We work hard to ensure your children are taught to read well at school, but we know that with your daily support the children will make even better progress. Without it, they could fall behind. Please support your child, and us, by:

  • Hearing your child read their book every day and recording this in the Home Reading Diary. ​ Practice does make perfect! Children can read their Reading Scheme book, their library book, comics, newspapers, websites, instructions, recipes.
  • Reading to your child. All our children love hearing a story. Choose a book that would be too difficult for younger children to read on their own, or a book you and your child could read together. The more children share stories at home, from the time they are babies, the better they understand how books work. They can recognise and use story language, can join in with rhymes and retell stories. The organisation Booktrust has more information here about how beneficial it is to read to your baby. http://www.booktrust.org.uk
  • Giving your child access to lots of stuff to read! Joining the local library means being ab​le to borrow 20 books at a time.
Useful Links

Here are some useful links that you can use at home:

www.wordsforlife.org.uk – advice, fun stuff to do together, recommended reads, activities for children from birth to 11 years.

www.booktrust.org.uk – a great website supporting parents in reading to children and inspiring children to read for pleasure, packed with ideas and information.

www.readingagency.org.uk – they say ‘because everything changes when we read’. A charity with a mission to inspire more people to read, they run the Summer Reading Challenge and other programmes for readers of all ages.

www.readingzone.com – a brilliant website with sections for children of all ages and families​, with news, reviews, author information, activities and much more.

www.theguardian.com/childrens-books-site – a huge amount of information, top tens of book themes, activities, reviews by children, author interviews etc. Something for everyone. ​